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August 2018

Being Cheap vs. Being Frugal
Money Management

Being Cheap vs. Being Frugal

Being Cheap vs. Being Frugal

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There is a huge difference between being cheap, and being frugal. These two words get used interchangeably, when they really are completely different. Yes, there are some things that will cross lines, but for the most part they are very different.

Being Cheap

Cheap means that you never spend any money and watch your money very closely. When you are cheap you spend the least amount of money.

When shopping, you simply are looking for the cheapest cost. When in reality there are many other pieces in play when determining “cost.”

Being cheap is usually driven from a place of scarcity or necessity. You don’t feel in control of your money, so you feel you must hold onto it.

Being Frugal

Being frugal comes from a place of abundance. You have power over your money and know exactly where it is going.

Instead of thinking solely about price, you take into consideration multiple value points. You think about cost, you think about how it helps others, you think about how long it will last.

These are just a few points, but you get the idea. Being frugal is being wise with your money and consciously choosing to be frugal with it.

Being Frugal vs. Being Cheap

An example of the difference between being cheap vs. being frugal that I experienced was bringing water to work. I would buy the cheapest water bottles I could find to refill when I was on the go in graduate school.

I was busy. I worked 8-3 and then had class from 4-7 every single day. I was working full time and attending school full time and making a measly $1,000/month on average.

What I found was that I was needing to buy new ones regularly because they were constantly breaking. I was living in a scarcity mindset because I didn’t have any extra cash each month.

Once I graduated, got my teaching job, and got my finances in order, I was able to move towards an abundance mindset. I no longer needed to live in this scarcity area.

I was able to see the other value points once I moved to an abundance mindset. My low cost water bottles I realized didn’t have much value because they were constantly breaking.

I took this into consideration, along with that they were always made from plastic, and researched higher value water bottles. Now, I’ve had mine for 3 years and it has dents and scratches, but it still serves the purpose of holding water.

This is just one example, but it serves as a reminder that there is a difference between being cheap and being frugal. It is all about the mindset you are currently living from. What are your thoughts about being cheap vs. being frugal?

 

Why You Need to Start Cash Flowing
Money Management

Why You Need to Start Cash Flowing

Why You Need to Start Cash Flowing

There are so many terms when it comes to personal finance and so many ways of doing things out there. I mean with a simple search on the Internet you will find endless resources for personal finance and how to go about getting your finances together. The most important is absolutely getting a budget together, cutting expenses, and increasing your income, but it’s also super important to create sinking funds and cash flowing larger expenses.

What is Cash Flowing?

This is one of those terms that is thrown around the personal finance world a lot and it makes sense, it’s super important. Cash flowing is when you have a larger expense and you delay the purchase until you have enough cash saved up for the expense. This tool is used when it is something you didn’t necessarily see coming (unlike a sinking fund that is for known expenses in the future). For example, I am cash flowing a new to me car instead of financing it. Of course, I could go out right now and get a car and finance it, but that would increase my debt. Something I am not interested in doing because I want to live a life of financial independence.

How to Start Cash Flowing.

You’re obviously not going to always use cash flowing, there is a time and a place. If it is a known expense that is happening in the future, like an oil change or yearly membership fee, you should have a sinking fund for it. If it’s something that you need to purchase and have time to save, then cash flow it. I’ll use my example of a new to me car. This isn’t an emergency and I have time to save for it. So, I’m adding money each month to a car fund I created. You need to decide where your priorities are and how quickly you want to cash flow the purchase. For me, I want to have it cash flowed by October, so I am sending a lot of my extra income from side hustles to this fund each month while still sending extra to my debts. Once you have made your decision, you can tweak your budget to find the cash for your purchase. Remember, a budget is not meant to restrict you, but to allow you to make the purchases you want.

Cash flowing has been a total game changer for me and my budget. Just by delaying a purchase until you have the cash to afford it, you can avoid putting yourself into debt. As I said earlier in this post, in order to obtain financial freedom, you can’t be burdened by debt and having to pay companies for past purchases with interest. Have you ever cash flowed a purchase?